TGI Friday! Our weekly round-up of recently published research abstracts | 1 August 2014

From the International Journal of MS Care, Summer 2014. Full paper available.

Short-Term Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Symptoms in Multiple Sclerosis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
A Pilot Study

Yvonne C. Learmonth, PhD; Lorna Paul, PhD; Angus K. McFadyen, PhD; Rebecca Marshall-McKenna, PhD; Paul Mattison, MD; Linda Miller, MPhil; Niall G. McFarlane, PhD
From the College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, UK (YCL, LP, RMM, NGM); Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA (YCL); AKM-STATS, Statistical Consultants, Glasgow, Scotland, UK (AKM); Multiple Sclerosis Service, NHS Ayrshire and Arran, Scotland, UK (PM, LM); and School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, Scotland, UK (LM).
Correspondence: Yvonne C. Learmonth, PhD, Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 906 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801; e-mail: ycl@illinois.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

This pilot study was conducted to determine whether a 15-minute bout of moderate-intensity aerobic cycling exercise would affect symptoms (pain and fatigue) and function (Timed 25-Foot Walk test [T25FW] and Timed Up and Go test [TUG]) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and to compare these results with those of a healthy control group.

METHODS

Eight people with MS (Expanded Disability Status Scale score 5–6; Karnofsky score 50–80), eight people with CFS (Karnofsky score 50–80), and eight healthy volunteers participated in the study. Pain and fatigue levels and results of the T25FW and TUG were established at baseline as well as at 30 minutes, 2 hours, and 24 hours following a 15-minute stationary cycling aerobic exercise test. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and covariance (ANCOVA) were used to analyze the findings over time.

RESULTS

At baseline there were statistically significant differences between groups in fatigue (P = .039), T25FW (P = .034), and TUG (P = .010). A significant group/time interaction emerged for fatigue levels (P= .005). We found no significant group/time interaction for pain levels or function.

CONCLUSIONS

Undertaking 15 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic cycling exercise had no significant adverse effects on pain or function in people with MS and CFS (with a Karnofsky score of 50–80) within a 24-hour time period. These initial results suggest that people with MS or CFS may undertake 15 minutes of cycling as moderate aerobic exercise with no expected negative impact on pain or function.


[West Nile virus is another post-infectious fatigue syndrome]

From Viral Immunology, 25 July 2014.

Evaluation of Prolonged Fatigue Post–West Nile Virus Infection and Association of Fatigue with Elevated Antiviral and Pro-inflammatory Cytokines

Melissa N. Garcia(1,2), Anne M. Hause(2), Christopher M. Walker(2), Jordan
S. Orange(3) Rodrigo Hasbun(4) and Kristy O. Murray(1,2)

1) Section of Pediatric Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, National School of Tropical Medicine, Houston, Texas.
2) School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.
3) Section of Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, National School of Tropical Medicine, Houston, Texas.
4) Medical School, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston,
Houston, Texas.
Address correspondence to:
Dr. Kristy O. Murray, Section of Pediatric Tropical Medicine, National School of Tropical Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030
E-mail: KMurray@bcm.edu

Abstract

This study aimed to characterize fatigue postinfection among study participants with a history of West Nile virus (WNV) infection and determine whether antiviral and pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly elevated in those reporting prolonged fatigue.

We found that 31% (44/140) of study participants experienced prolonged (more than 6 months) fatigue postinfection, with an average length of fatigue duration of 5 years.

Females, those younger than 50 years of age, and those with symptomatic clinical WNV disease were significantly more likely to report fatigue.

Pro-inflammatory and antiviral cytokines (granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor, interferon-γ, interferon-γ inducing protein 10, interleukin 2, interleukin 6, and interleukin 12p70) were significantly elevated in those reporting fatigue postinfection
compared to those not reporting fatigue.

Clinicians should consider history of WNV infection as a possible factor when evaluating causes of prolonged fatigue following a febrile viral illness in their patients.


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